Romania neo-latină ca Romanland în globish

Acesta este un excerpt preluat de la adresa URL http://www.romanity.org/htm/fox.01.en.what_if_anything_is_a_byzantine.01.htm :

+Montesquieu used the word „Byzantine.” The word „Byzantine” denoted the Empire and connoted its supposed characteristics: dishonesty, dissimulation and decadence. The English scholar Edward Gibbon in his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire treated the Empire after the sixth century as an epic of unrelieved degradation and corruption. The people who lived in the „Byzantine Empire” never knew nor used the word „Byzantine.” They know themselves to be Romans, nothing more and absolutely nothing less. By transferring the Imperial capital from Rome on the Tiber to the New Rome on Bosphorus, dubbed Constantinople, the Emperor Constantine I had transferred the actual identity of Rome to the new location. Long before Constantine I, the idea of „Rome” had become dissociated from the Eternal City on the Tiber. For a Roman meant a Roman citizen, whereever he lived. Before the Imperial period, in 89 BC, a Roman law had granted Roman citizenship to people throughout Italy. Afterwards, citizenship became extended to an increasing number of people in different parts of the Empire. In 212, Emperor Caracalla declared all free persons in the Empire to be Roman citizens, entitled to call themselves Roman, not merely subject to the Romans. Within a few decades, people begin to refer to the entire Empire less often [in Latin] as „Imperium Romanorum” [Domain of the Romans] and more often as „Romania” [Romanland]+

Pentru conformitate,

Titus Filipas

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